Remnant Vanity Top Installation

After installing the medicine cabinets in our master bathroom, the vanity was clearly in need refreshing. I’m not a big fan of wood countertops in general.  They don’t hold up well to moisture (no matter what people on Pinterest say about Waterlox), and you can usually find a good deal on a solid surface countertop if you shop around-avoiding Home Depot at all costs.

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After pricing several places, I found a local granite store with a large lot of remnant pieces.  Remnants are great options for bathroom vanities or small kitchens.  Each remnant is priced the same per square foot, the only question is finding a piece you like that will fit your space.  I took my measurements and found a piece of Carrera marble that came to $447, self installed, for a 53″ x 23″ vanity with a sink cutout and polished edge.

A week later it was ready to be picked up.   Jason detached the plumbing fixtures and removed the original vanity top with a chisel and hammer.

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He then pried the old sink (which we were reusing) from the wood, and scraped any remaining caulk from the edges.

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The marble was surprisingly heavy, so it took both of us to slide it in place.  Here’s a close-up:

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After squeezing a toothpaste thick smear of Kwik Seal around the lip of the sink, I guided Jason from above to get it in place.  In Home Stone had drilled holes into the base to attach sink clips that secured the bowl.

 

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While we allowed the caulk to dry overnight, I gave the cabinets two coats of Benjamin Moore Aura in Fieldstone, replaced the hardware, and painted the walls in Benjamin Moore’s Halo.  A little paint always makes a huge difference.

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I was slightly anxious about the dark wood mirrors with the light vanity, but the end result was even better than I’d imagined.  Best of all, we managed to create a whole new vanity for less than $500.

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Once we finish the backsplash our master bathroom upgrade will be complete.